Guide MURDER KNOWS NO COLOR (A Novelette)

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No gun is found anywhere in the sealed room and the bullet that wounds King came from Judah's gun — which didn't actually fire. Good, huh? Two men toss a coin and whoever loses has to commit a murder and try to pin the blame on the other. There are only two possible suspects to the subsequent crime and both have ironclad alibis. Seven solutions present themselves to the detectives in this ultra-twisty novel. A wealthy artist, Heikichi Umezawa, is finishing up his great cycle of paintings on Zodiacal subjects when his head is smashed in with a blunt object.

The studio is locked from the inside and the suspects have alibis. Over the next four decades many of Umezawa's family members are also gruesomely killed, most in "impossible" ways. In a series of postmodern asides Soji Shimada repeatedly taunts the reader explaining that all the clues are there for an astute observer. Someone breaks into Professor Grimaud's study, kills him and leaves, with the only door to the room locked from the inside, and with people present in the hall outside the room. The ground below the window is covered with unbroken snow.


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All the elements are balanced just right in this, the best of Dickson Carr's many locked-room problems. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins Rachel Verinder's cursed Indian diamond the Moonstone disappears from her room after her birthday party. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie Eight people with guilty secrets are invited to an isolated island off the coast of Devon where they begin to be murdered one by one. The Big Bow Mystery by Israel Zangwill Mrs Drabdump's lodger is discovered with his throat cut, no trace of a murder weapon and no way a murderer could have got in or out.

The King Is Dead by Ellery Queen King Bendigo, a wealthy munitions magnate, has been threatened by his brother Judah, who announces that he will shoot King at midnight at his private island residence. The Hollow Man by John Dickson Carr Someone breaks into Professor Grimaud's study, kills him and leaves, with the only door to the room locked from the inside, and with people present in the hall outside the room.

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Writer's Grove: February 12222

John Dies at the End by David Wong A rollercoaster of weird, sprung from a hallucinogenic and possibly demonic drug known as soy sauce and written in bracing, punchy style shooting swift sentences, often sliced to seven words or less, and stung with spicy diction detailing psychedelic imagery and delivered with sustained breathlessness.

Something of a punk-rock-ified, video-game-esque tear and tumble into the Weird Tales tradition, Wong a.

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Savaging the Dark by Christopher Conlon Whereas Tampa introduced an admitted predator from the first page, Conlon takes care to build a believable case for how Mona justifies her taboo actions, even as her control of the situation—and her sanity—slip out of her grasp. Of all the novels on this list, Savaging the Dark may be one of the scariest if only because of its plausibility. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier Geek Love by Katherine Dunn Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill An over-the-hill rock star buys a haunted suit on the Internet. World War Z by Max Brooks Zombie fiction has never come close to the cultural impact and artistic importance of zombie cinema, until World War Z came along.

He shows us how the infection could realistically spread around the globe thanks to human trafficking. He shows us how modern militaries could possibly be defeated via poor planning and mass defections. He shows us how society might be after 90 percent of humanity has been killed and an uneasy rebuilding period has begun. The Other by Thomas Tryon Little Star by John Ajvide Lindqvist With shades of Carrie , Little Star does little to dissuade that similarity.


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  6. Two young girls, one extraordinary and one suffocating under her own feelings of mediocrity, connect online and form a friendship that will have terrible consequences. Lindqvist taps into the modern-day fears that drive adolescent anxiety—less locker room, more Internet comment section—and stretches them out to their most disturbing logical conclusion.

    The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes While horror has always flourished on the small-press scene, Lauren Beaukes is helping to forge a continued legacy for the genre at major publishers as well. As in her exceptional follow-up, Broken Monsters , South African novelist Beukes weaves together a diverse cast of characters and just enough science fiction to complicate her premise without distracting from the horror at hand. Girl Next Door by Jack Ketchum The novel, which is based on the Indiana murder case of Sylvia Likens, follows single mother, alcoholic and next-door neighbor Ruth, who takes in two nieces after their parents die in a car accident.

    At the Mountains of Madness by H. Lovecraft Madness in particular has captivated the imaginations of audiences consistently since it was first published in , and its bitterly cold, ice-caked horrors can be felt reverberating through the ages and all the way into modern AMC TV series such as the first season of The Terror.

    And when those forces wake up to the annoyance of human incursion? The Ceremonies by T. Klein Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice Is the novel truly horror, or is it gothic romance?

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    What an absurd delineation! A traveling carnival brings tempting delights and sinister frights, and readers young and old should find this one to be a timeless autumnal classic. The Terror by Dan Simmons From Song of Kali and Carrion Comfort to a host of sci-fi classics, Dan Simmons is no stranger to lengthy literary outings. American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis Ellis received hate mail, death threats and became the subject of immense criticism after serial killer Paul Bernardo was found with a copy of the book.

    He tortures a homeless man. At one point, he gets his hands on a chainsaw. The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris What the novel also does particularly well is make us probe into the motivations and ambition of Starling, going beyond her desire to simply help people and catch a killer. Opposed at nearly every turn by the institutional roadblocks erected in the path of female FBI trainees, the reader can sense the desperation of Starling and her borderline selfish desire to stand out and prove herself to her entirely male superiors.

    You can also sense this is part of the reason that Lecter takes an interest in her, finding her ambitions an interesting character trait that he can use to wrap Starling around his finger. Pet Sematary by Stephen King By the time Pet Sematary was published in , a mythology had grown around it.

    The Most Anticipated Crime Books of 12222: Part 1

    There was some truth to this. When a cat belonging to his daughter was killed on the busy truck route in front of his house, King wondered: what would happen if he buried the cat, and three days later it came back, somewhat altered? In this slow-burn psychological thriller of past traumas come back to haunt the present, a woman leading a retiring life in a quiet, small village finds herself immersed in painful childhood memories when her old music teacher, who molested many of his students, comes to visit.

    A haunting meditation on trauma, secrets, and long-overdue retribution.

    In The Overnight Kidnapper , Montalbano is faced with a vexing mystery after a number of women are kidnapped and held overnight, then released under strange circumstances. Warren and Flora Dane are back in a new thriller about lingering evil and the need for closure that can never quite be achieved, as a strange new murder case stirs up old troubles. Gardner is a staple of the thriller scene, with each new installment a cause for excitement and feverish reading.

    MURDER KNOWS NO COLOR (A Novelette)

    The Hiding Place is a thriller in every sense of the word and promises plenty of lingering trauma, intricate vengeance schemes, and one heart-pounding turn after another. The second in what will hopefully be a long-running series featuring Detective Inspector Adam Fawley of the Oxford police, In the Dark promises to be just as engrossing and complex as her previous book, Close to Home. While Home was a sharp take on the increasingly common missing child thriller, Dark reckons with discovering how dangerously little we know about our neighbors.

    Detective Superintendent Alan Banks is back on the case with a new investigation, this time into two mysteriously connected deaths, one on a country lane, the other in you guessed it the moorland. Robinson is just about synonymous with Yorkshire crime fiction at this point, with a bevy of readers eagerly awaiting their next journey alongside DS Banks into the wild and surprisingly murderous English countryside.

    Hannah is a modern-day queen of suspense and just about anything she writes is sure to leave your spine tingling. In The Next to Die , a serial killer is marking his victims by presenting them with cryptic books, and a standup comedian finds herself with one of those very books, presumably next in line for the slaughter. Hannah moves the action along but always knows just where to linger as the terror settles in and spreads across every facet of the story. In Last Night , her NYPD detective explores the world of Brighton Beach, an old Russian stronghold, but in this case, cross-cultural identity and privileges complicate matters.

    Ellis takes a balanced, penetrating look at trauma and the lasting impact of crime. This hipster mystery hipstery? What happened to Edie is connected with a secret one or more of her friends has been hiding. This is a fever dream of a novel, a portrait of a hypocritical, oppressive society and the strained, uncanny lives of its citizens. Michele W. Parks continues to bring us hard-boiled fiction set in Glasgow in the s, a town and setting that should get the noir fan sitting up straight in anticipation of some of the most brutal and beautiful prose around. In in Belfast, Jean McConville was brutally abducted from her home and children in one of the most horrifying incidents of The Troubles; her remains would not be found for over thirty years.

    In the meantime, though her attack was an open secret, nobody would come forward to authorities with information about the culprits. New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe frames this penetrating study of The Troubles and the aftermath with an in-depth look at the McConville case. Long overdue answers are unearthed in the dogged investigation, but a bigger perspective is also presented: through interviews and archival work, Radden Keefe brings readers to the very heart of the trauma, to the atrocities committed on both sides, and to the very human cost.

    Early spring brings us a new Donna Leon novel once again, this one the twenty-eighth in the ever popular, ever enjoyable Commissario Guido Brunetti series. This time, the Commissario is being asked to take on an investigation of a more personal nature, when an elderly and aristocratic family friend states his intention to adopt a young man of mysterious origins and to make him his heir. Family and professional duties intersect as a murder investigation also unfolds; and of course Venice is always at its most beguiling and enchanting when seen through the lens of a Leon mystery.

    Russell is always sharp with the procedural aspects of crime, but here he branches out into some memorably haunting atmospherics. With this follow-up to the debut, Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions , Giordano looks to cement the series starring Auntie Poldi, retiree, wine aficionado, a woman of honor with a nose for mystery and an appreciation for the many delights of the Sicilian countryside. The Auntie Pold mysteries offer up plenty of great armchair traveling and detection, bringing a strong note of the sensual back to the southern European mystery.

    Anna Smith is a longtime reporter turning to crime fiction in a big way, with this high-octane, finely observed thriller. Typical to Parks work, this one will keep readers gripped from the first page and promises plenty of heart-pounding action and a few bad guys taught the hard ways of justice. American Mystery Classics continues to turn up lost gems and authors for mystery lovers to re-discover.

    Armstrong was herself an accomplished playwright and is an informed, witty guide to a fascinating subculture. In this extremely French take on gentrification, land fraud, and other capitalist schemes, a real estate developer is cast into the sea in a depressed northern town after his plans to revitalize the area with a gleaming new seaside resort fail to come to fruition. Kistler, a former Philadelphia litigator, makes a highly toured debut with House on Fire , a domestic suspense novel that looks at a very modern family experiencing a moment of tumult after a drunk-driving accident kills one child and puts the other on trial for manslaughter.

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    Kistler has a clear mastery of the legal drama but also a deft touch with complicated family dynamics and the tightening noose of a trauma that refuses all efforts at a cut-and-dry solution. Joe R. From the originator of splatter-gore and author of the East Texas-set Hap and Leonard series comes a new adventure for his odd couple of investigators and their no-nonsense boss who, after many years of a Sam-and-Diane situation, is now married to Hap.

    Hap and Leonard are trying to get home through one of the worst floods in memory and floods are no joke in pine country when the happen upon a fugitive woman with two goons in hot pursuit. An English teacher with an expansive knowledge of gothic literature finds herself tangled in a web of murder and mystery that begins more and more to be a kind of twisted work of gothic storytelling in this impressive new mystery. Griffiths writes at the perfect intersection of procedural and psychological thriller, with her latest adding a strong dose of dark atmospherics to spin a truly unnerving story.

    In this wicked historical thriller set in Stockholm, a mutilated body is the start to an investigation that brings in every class and every corner of the city, in what promises to be one of the most well-researched historicals of the year. But, for those who need a bit more enticement, know that this novel is also about nostalgia and cinephilia and Cold War spycraft and also maybe Hitler survived and needs to be caught.

    D ouble Exposure is standout spy fiction sure to win over readers, hopefully heralding the launch of a new thriller series. An electrifying debut from Australian author J. Pomare has a firm grip on the psychological torment and striving that piece this complex, riveting story together.

    Fresh from his triumphant conclusion to the Natchez Burning trilogy, Greg Iles once again looks to entertain and educate in equal measure. In his latest, the murder of an archaologist prompts an investigation into local history by a hot-shot D.